Effects of culture-based chants on labour pain during the latent stage of labour in first-time mothers: A randomized controlled trial

  • Bhuvaneswari Ramesh Center for Music Therapy Education and Research, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Pondicherry
  • Sumathy Sundar Center for Music Therapy Education and Research, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Pondicherry
  • Jayapreetha R Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry
  • Sunitha Samal Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry
  • Seetesh Ghose Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute. Pondicherry 607402

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Labour is a complex and very painful experience. Poorly relieved pain  result in prolonged and stressful labour, maternal impatience in opting for caesarean section and postpartum complications. A positive childbirth experience   has a lasting impact on the postpartum health and wellbeing of the new mothers. Music therapy has been studied to reduce labour pain perception and behaviours and provide a positive childbirth experience.


 Methods:  A total of 120 primiparous women in the latent stage of labour with regular contractions and dilatations less than 4 cms were   included in the study and randomly divided into two groups.  music group (n=60) received music therapy in the form of deep breathing and chanting  exercises for one hour between each and every contraction  and the control group (n=60) received  only standard treatment. A 10-point visual analogue pain scale (VAS) and Behavioural Pain Rating Scale (BPRS) were measured and recorded by the investigators.  Independent and paired t tests were used for statistical analysis.


 Results: Independent t tests indicated that pain levels and the total BPRS scores showed statistically significant reduction in the music therapy group (p<0.001). Also, the BPRS domain  scores in facial expression, restlessness, vocalization and consolation indicated significant reduction in the music therapy group (p<0.001). The domain of BPRS – muscle tone did not have a significant reduction in the music therapy group. Paired t tests revealed non-significant increase in pain scores and significant decrease in pain behaviour scores in the music group with p=0.046 and p<0.001 respectively and significant increase in both the pain scores and pain behavioural scores in the control group with p values <0.001 post intervention.


 Conclusion: Chanting and deep breathing experiences as music therapy during the latent stage of labour may reduce pain perception and pain behaviours. Such music therapy interventions may provide positive experiences during child birth and could be a safe and dependable method adopted for an effective labour pain management


 Keywords: music therapy, mothers-to-be, first stage of labour, pain, pain perception, pain behavioural symptoms

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Author Biographies

Bhuvaneswari Ramesh, Center for Music Therapy Education and Research, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Pondicherry

Tutor, Center for Music Therapy Education and Research, Pondicherry - 607402

Jayapreetha R, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry - 607402

Sunitha Samal, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry

Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Seetesh Ghose, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute. Pondicherry 607402

Professor and Head, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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Published
2018-02-19
How to Cite
RAMESH, Bhuvaneswari et al. Effects of culture-based chants on labour pain during the latent stage of labour in first-time mothers: A randomized controlled trial. SBV Journal of Basic Clinical and Applied Health Science, [S.l.], v. 2, n. 1, p. 16-19, feb. 2018. Available at: <https://www.jbcahs.org/journal/article/view/50>. Date accessed: 21 june 2018.